Dr. Decker Weiss - Medical Deployment to the Middle East | #AshWednesday

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Dr. Decker Weiss shares stories from his Medical Deployment to Refugee Camps in the Middle East and how Jigsaw Health's products are making an impact worldwide. #AshWednesday

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Transcript by Rev.com

- Hi everybody, I'm Ashley with Jigsaw Health and today I'm here with Dr. Decker Weiss, naturopathic cardiologist and also a member of Jigsaw's advisory board. Dr. Decker has recently been on a medical mission over to Iraq and we wanna talk a little bit about that.

- Sure. It's my honor to do that. I was a medical deployment for about three weeks. Along with medications and diagnostics I came packed with quite a bit of Jigsaw product. Electrolytes and probiotics specifically and magnesium. Those three things really came into play. It was nice not just to constantly use meds. Every time they got an antibiotic, I was giving them a probiotic so they wouldn't get co-infections afterwards and things. It really felt good. I can rely on the products but also just being in that Iraq setting and seeing Jigsaw. It was really cool. One of the wonderful t-shirts you had, we gave it to one of the _ girls and she was running around in this Got Mag t-shirt so it was pretty cool.

- I love it. Well we love to be able to help underwrite missions like this and be part of something bigger. How long were you over there?

- I was there for about three weeks, a combination of different parts of Iraq and Beirut working in some of the refugee camps with Syrians up in the northeast of Lebanon and that as well as Beirut.

- Wow, I know I would love to hear a couple of stories and I'm sure our audience would as would as well that you could possibly share that you experienced over there.

- They're long days and you're really hot and you're carrying equipment. Then you're behind a table. They say there's air conditioning and it drops it from about 100 to about 95. It always comes down to people that are inspiring. I think there's one girl that stands out to me. She was about 12 years old. She was kidnapped by ISIS. She was a slave which involved everything from living on the floor in garbage to being repeatedly raped. She had some medical conditions and I worked with her. But she was saying all these English words to me and speaking to me trying to learn. I was like where'd you learn English? Well they had American magazines. She was saying through a translator and I was trying to learn English.

- Wow.

- We think we've multi tasked. I thought working my way through med school was tough. But that's not even the good part of the story. I was like how are you doing? She's like I will not let these people ruin my life. There are good people in the world. There are good men in the world. There are people who are caring. I'm not gonna let two years of my life ruin the rest of it. I'm gonna learn English, I'm gonna go to America, I'm gonna go to university and I'm gonna come back here and I'm gonna fix it. She was empowered and beautiful and she wasn't even 12 years old.

- That's incredible.

- The day I got there, part of _ was taken and they heard this girl crying in a closet. They got her and they realized it was a girl that they thought had been killed. She was kidnapped at three years old and now she was six years old, it was three years later. They got to pick up the phone and call the parents and say we found your daughter.

- Wow.

- I was there all tearing up. I was there my buddy Steve Nabeal, who's one of our facilitators there and Dr. Ali and Tom _, we went to the Christian refugee camp where her family was and we watched it when she was given back to her family. All the things that these volunteers and docs and all this stuff, it really all does matter. There's horrible, horrible things going on. When you leave there, you leave with those. You can't leave with the tragedy. You have to leave with you didn't solve a problem but you might have put a little dent in it. You represented your country and the people liked Jigsaw well. I tried to do that. You leave with your batteries charged, feeling good about life. The spirit, the human spirit, and the spirit of young women is the strongest thing I think in the world. I don't think there's anything stronger or more powerful. You get some of these young women that have gone through some of these terrible things, there is no stopping them. They not only hold onto hope, they wanna fix the world and give hope back.

- That's amazing, that's absolutely incredible and we're so thankful for people like you that go.

- I think there's something else. People see Jigsaw on labels and who is this Jigsaw company? Nobody's ever heard of them in Iraq. None of my other colleagues had really heard of it. If I had to describe Jigsaw Health to the outsiders, it is a very, very small company doing incredibly big things. The commitment you have made to refugees and research is ongoing. Jigsaw didn't just fund this trip. There is an ongoing monthly cash infusion. So it's not just product, it's cash which is hard for companies to give along with product as needed. When I went to see Patrick and I said I need this and he's like how much? I think he would have unloaded the whole warehouse if I was willing to take it. He never said no. Everybody with an antibiotic got a probiotic which means less infection is spreading, less fungal stuff. Good, good, good. I'm handing refugees streaming out a bottle of water and electrolytes 'cause water's only gonna go so far. They've got to get it. And they're putting the electrolytes in baby bottles, in baby bottles. You're watching Jigsaw being dumped into baby bottles with refugees streaming out. This is a tiny company. It's a tiny company out of Scottsdale, Arizona, that is doing groundbreaking research and ready to publish a study that's gonna change mineral industry along with magnesium forever. It looks like major journals are fighting over the ability to print this thing as they should be. You're seeing what a small, focused group of people can do who genuinely care and that impact it can have on the world. And I'm very, very thankful to be a part of it.

- Well, we're thankful for you. We're especially thankful for our audience out there, the customers that help to support us and our company to build these products and to get them out there to the world. So thank you very much. We really couldn't do this without you. And thank you so much Dr. Decker Weiss.

- Thank you.

- Hey guys, thanks so much for tuning into this video. If you like it, please share it and we'll see you next week.

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