Bulgarian Yogurt VS. Greek Yogurt | #ScienceSaturday

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You've heard of Greek Yogurt... Ever heard of Bulgarian Yogurt?

Thomas DeLauer breaks down the difference between Bulgarian Yogurt and Greek Yogurt on the latest #ScienceSaturday

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Transcript by Rev.com

- What's going on in Jigsaw land? It's Thomas DeLauer and as you well know, whenever you are consuming magnesium it's going to help get your system moving. It's relaxing your colon, it's relaxing your gut, so it's making it, well, so you can do, well, your business a little bit easier. But whenever you can't get your hands on some magnesium, the best bet might be utilizing some different kinds of yogurt, so in this video I'm going to break down the difference between Greek yogurt and Bulgarian yogurt, which might be one that you've never even heard of before so let's get down to the details. 

-So first thing I want to talk about is Greek yogurt. I'm going to give you a quick breakdown of how Greek yogurt is actually created. So when you first start out with yogurt, you strain it. You strain it a couple of times. With Greek yogurt, you are straining it multiple times until it's thicker. Essentially, you're getting the whey out of the yogurt so you're left with just a solid. This ends up leaving you with a little bit more sugar and a little bit more depth and consistency to the actual yogurt. It also ends up giving you a little bit of a higher protein content which, in theory, when we're talking about ketosis people think that that's good but if you've watched a lot of my videos then you know that protein isn't really the answer. We are looking for a higher fat versus a higher protein. 

-When we look at the bacteria strains in Greek yogurt, we have thermophilus and bulgaricus so two very defined kinds of bacteria. Now these kinds of bacteria work predominately in your upper intestinal tract. So we're talking about stomach bloating, we're talking helping aide in digestion when it comes down to first eating food. We're not talking about colonization within the gut, we're not talking about colonization in the colon, we're talking about fairly localized intestinal flora that's going to be sitting in your small intestine and in your stomach for the most part. 

-Now, again, because it's a higher protein content you also end up having a lot more risk of it going through gluconeogenesis and converting into a sugar so the carb content in Greek yogurt is already naturally high but the protein has a propensity to convert into even more sugar. I'm not saying that Greek yogurt's bad, I'm just saying that Bulgarian yogurt might be a better example to use on a ketogenic diet. So that's when we take a look at Bulgarian yogurt. 

-Bulgarian yogurt is a little bit different in the fact that it is not strained so you're left with all the goodness that's normally going to come from yogurt but it's not going through the straining process which means you're left with a little bit more whey, which in theory would make you think that there would be more milk sugar in it but since there are more bacteria strains in Bulgarian yogurt, they feed off of the sugar and end up killing off the sugar so you ultimately end up with a much better yogurt that ends up having more in the way of probiotic strains. 

-So, in this case, we're looking at bulgaricus that's in here, we're looking at acidophilus, we're also looking at the thermophilus and we're still looking at the bifidum that's in there. So we've got four different kinds of probiotic bacteria that are going into a Bulgarian yogurt versus two different kinds that are going into Greek yogurt, thereby giving you a much more diverse set of bacteria that's going to go into your intestinal tract. And some of the bacteria that's in Bulgarian yogurt has been shown to colonize a bit more not only in the small intestine but also into the large intestine, which means that you are getting the probiotic activity that you need not just in the stomach but all the way through the intestinal tract and all the way through the colon which can help you out immensely when you're on a ketogenic diet when you're sometimes lacking the fiber that you might need to be able to get the digestion that you probably want. 

-Last, but not least, when we're looking at Bulgarian yogurt is a significantly lower carb content. So for example, when we take a look at Bulgarian yogurt, we have five grams of carbohydrates per serving for a one cup serving with eight grams of fat and then with Greek yogurt we have nine grams of carbs and eleven grams of fat for the full fat but not many people eat the full fat version. You see the problem here is since it is already a higher carbohydrate content and we're combining that with an already high fat content, we're getting a little bit of an insulin spike that's happening whenever we're having the carbohydrates that are coming from the milk sugar. So carbs plus fat equals storing fat a lot easier. Whereas here, we have a much lower level of carbohydrates, you're not having that insulin spike as much. Plus, the extra bacteria are going to help break down the sugars a little bit more. 

-Anyway, one isn't necessarily better than the other. Greek yogurt's going to be better if you want a little bit more protein but Bulgarian yogurt is going to be a bit better if you're looking for the diverse probiotic effect since there's about 90 billion CFU in a serving of Bulgarian yogurt versus Greek yogurt, about 25 - 30 billion CFU. Still a lot of bacteria but one is almost three times as much as the other. 

-So, as always, Jigsaw Land, make sure you're keeping it locked in here and click on the link and check out Jigsaw's MagSRT so that you can get the wide spectrum of magnesium that you need to keep your system moving quite well so you don't have to be living on Bulgarian yogurt. I'll see you soon.

  • Thomas DeLauer
  • Yogurt
  • bacteria
  • digestion
  • protein
  • sugar
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